Lunch at Osteria Waggon and Horses, Milton

Osteria Waggon & Horses in Milton has been on my list for a while since various friends gave rave reviews but despite being deceptively close to where I live it’s just a little far to walk and there is no bus back from Milton after dinner would be finished so the only time I can get there and back easily is Saturday lunchtime when I’m usually out shopping or do other things. I finally managed to get the timing right and visited last Saturday and really regretted not having done this earlier.
The former pub was stripped down to a very simple and clean style with well spaced tables in the dining area and a small bar area. The menu consists of a blackboard of aperitivi, small plates of meat, fish, veg, salad, charcuterie and everything else they can think of on the day, a bit like Spanish tapas. I think there were at least 10 different ones on the board when I was there. Two make about a starter portion. The printed menu has starters, pasta, mains and desserts, all rather more varied than what you usually find at Italian places. There is also a set lunch option on weekdays and a “Taste” menu on weekends.

Aperitivi and bread selection
Squid ink bread

I chose two aperitivi, ox tongue with salsa verde on the left and salted sardines on the right, with their bread selection. The bread was warm and delicious (the black blob was made with squid ink, the standout one was the foccaccia), the ox tongue tender and rich nicely complemented by the fresh salsa verde. The salted sardines were small, more like anchovies, the tapenade was not too strong in olive flavour (proper olives, too, not those dyed ones you often get) and the lemon jelly cut through the richness.

Jerusalem artichoke risotto

My main was a superb vegetarian risotto with jerusalem artichokes, pesto, beetroot and parmesan crisps. Perfect consistency, rice al dente (which might not be to everyone’s taste) and a great balance of flavours and textures. This was a joy to eat, easily among the best risotti I’ve had anywhere.

By this time I was quite full already but I couldn’t pass on dessert:

Gianduja semifreddo, black sesame ice cream

This seemed to be the lightest option (with the exception of the gelato selection), a gianduja semifreddo (the chocolate glazed log), black sesame ice cream, truffles and chocolate soil. The gianduja was rich but not too sweet, helped by the dark chocolate glaze. The ice cream was rather remarkable, too, first time I had one based on black sesame. The truffles were excellent, too.

The experience was rounded up by friendly and helpful service. Osteria might be a little more expensive than other neighbourhood Italians but the extra cost is entirely justified by the quality of the offerings and I can only recommend it.
Next time I want to go with a few friends and go through the whole aperitivi menu.

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[Cooking] Duckmas

It was my first Christmas not only in Cambridge (I usually visit my parents in Germany) but also in my new flat which has a proper kitchen. So I decided to treat three of my friends to a hearty lunch. I ordered a duck from Radmore Farm who have a small but fine shop in Chesterton Road and instead of roasting it (I don’t trust my oven which is overheating and inconsistent) I jointed it. Out of the legs and the meaty parts of the wings I made confit (using leftover salmon cure with added garlic, crushed peppercorns and thyme), the breasts I pan-fried and finished in the oven and out of the carcass, wing tips and giblets I made stock.
I had two bags of giblets so I made a little snack of flash-fried hearts.

Duck hearts

From the various trimmings and bits of meat scraped off the carcass I made a burger:

Duck burger

The livers I turned into parfait (half a shallot, one glove of garlic finely chopped, sweated off in clarified butter, added the livers until cooked dark pink, then pulsed with salt, pepper and a glug of cream in the food processor). Served on crispbread, this was the starter at Boxing Day, together with the cured salmon:

Nibbles: whisky cured salmon and duck liver parfait

I clarified the stock, kept one half for cooking the lentils and the other half I reduced down with some red wine to make a sauce. The final dish consisted of picked leg and wing meat, sliced breast, lentils and broccoli:

Duck: pan roasted breast, confit leg, lentils broccoli

[Cooking] Whisky cured salmon.

My latest fishbox included a beautiful fillet of salmon which I decided to cure.
Method:
Rub the fillet with whisky (something peaty and smoky is ideal, I used Jura).
Make a mix of equal quantities of salt and light brown sugar (enough to generously coat both sides of the fillet) and add some lightly crushed dried rosemary.
On a large piece of aluminium foil in two layers, spread a layer of the cure, set the fillet on top, skin side down, then spread the rest of the mix over the top and dribble some more whisky over the top.
Wrap the fillet tightly in the foil and leave in the fridge at least over night, longer if the fillet is really thick. The one I had was just about 1cm so over night was plenty.
To serve, wash the cure off the fillet and pat dry, then slice finely at a very flat angle. A fish knife with a flexible blade is ideal for this. You can wrap the salmon in clingfilm and it’ll keep for a few days in the fridge.
Serve on melba toast, crackers or crispbread. Add a little light horseradish or mustard cream if you fancy it but with mine, that wasn’t necessary.
Sliced, mine looked like this;

Whisky cured salmon

[Cooking] Sunday lunch: pheasant with cauliflower puree and mushroom sauce

I walked past Mill Road Butchers on Friday and decided to pop in to see what they had. The pheasants looked good so I picked up one for the Sunday.
As pheasant is notoriously dry I decided to cook it in parts. On Saturday I took off the legs and put them in brine (Water, salt, thyme, rosemary, smashed garlic. black peppercorns and allspice berries) to sit in the fridge over night. I also took off the breasts and chopped the carcass into chunks. The breasts went back into the fridge, the carcass with some chunks of onion and root veg into a hot oven until nicely browned, deglazed the roasting dish with a generous glug of port, filled up with water and let boil for a while to get all the bits off the bottom, then transferred the lot plus a good handful of dried mushrooms into a saucepan and simmered for a couple of hours, then passed the stock through a fine sieve, retaining the mushrooms and let it cool before moving it to the fridge.

On Sunday morning I patted the brined legs dry with kitchen paper, added them and the aromatics from the brine to a saucepan with barely simmering duck fat, waited until it was back to a simmer and then transferred the pan, covered in foil, to a low oven (just under 100 degrees on my dial, I checked every now and then that it stayed at a simmer). After about two hours they were done, nice and soft to the touch. I took them out and fried them skin side down in a hot pan until crispy (a few minutes). Then removed them and kept them warm while frying the breasts in lots of butter on a medium heat until nice and pink in the middle.

Then I checked the seasoning and served the lot, for I am greedy and was on my own, with crushed potatoes, steamed curly kale, cauliflower puree (see below) and a sauce made by reducing the stock with the mushrooms.

The cauliflower puree I started the day before by chopping the head into chunks, tossing them with olive oil, smoked paprika, cinnamon, sumac, salt and pepper and roasting them in a medium hot oven until soft and caramelised. On the Sunday, I reheated the chunks, added some stock and pureed them in the food processor, adding a little bit of whole milk for consistency. This was the element that brought everything together and I only made it because I had a cauliflower I needed to use up. I originally wanted to make soup but then had the idea to make a puree. The spicing worked really well.

[Cooking] Braised lamb neck, sweet potato mash, curly kale

I love cheaper cuts that need a bit of love and attention so when the Art of Meat had lamb neck, I picked up a few chunks.
I dusted them with seasoned flour (salt, pepper, smoked paprika), seared them in rapeseed oil in a hot casserole until brown all over, took them out and in the same pan fried chunks of onion, leek, carrot and garlic until softened slightly, put the meat back in, about half a litre of red wine and chicken stock each to just cover,added a sprig each of rosemary and thyme, put a lid on, let it come to a simmer and transferred to a 100 degree oven for about 3 hours. I took out the meat to rest, strained the liquid, took half of it and reduced it until it was thickened a bit and shiny. Adjusted the seasoning with salt, pepper, smoked paprika, ras el hanout and sumac. Meanwhile, in the rest of the stock, I cooked the sweet potatoes until tender and mashed them with milk, butter and seasoning.
Finally, I picked the meat off the bones, removing excess fat and gristle, warmed it through in the sauce and served on top of the sweet potato mash and some steamed and buttered kale.
Plated it looked like this

Braised lamb neck, sweet potato mash, curly kale
This also freezes well and is even better the second time round, like many stews and braises

Pig Shop at Pint Shop, an Eat Cambridge event

As part of the 2015 Eat Cambridge food festival, Pint Shop ran an event called Pig Shop, an evening of pork and beer, introduced by author and journalist Andrew Webb.

Pint Shop No. 1 Andrew Webb

After a aperitiv in the shape of a “Pint Shop No. 1” and an introduction by Andrew, Stuart and David of Barker Brothers Butchers demonstrated how to make sausages and how to butcher a pig’s head.

Pig's Head Butchery Pig's Head Butchery

Afterwards, we all had a go at making sausages and butchering half a pig’s head. I didn’t join in the sausagemaking but did butcher a pig’s head with varied results as it’s definitely not easy. I did get enough meat out of it for a decent meal, though.

Sausage Making Sausage Making
Sausage Making

Pig's Head Butchery Pig's Head Butchery
Sausage Making Sausage Making

Then Stuart Barker showed us how they break down a whole side. This was most impressive, even for a task they do several times a week, and he slowed down for us so we could see where and how he was cutting.

Whole side of pig butchery Whole side of pig butchery
Whole side of pig butchery Whole side of pig butchery
Whole side of pig butchery Whole side of pig butchery Whole side of pig butchery
Whole side of pig butchery Whole side of pig butchery

Watching and helping with this butchery had made us hungry so we were very keen to sit down and await the meal the chefs in the Pint Shop kitchens had prepared for us:

Crispy Pig's Ears
Crispy Pig’s Head, apple&rhubarb sauce (beer: Moor Revival): Some of the ear pieces were better than others, the best ones were like really good crackling. The rhubarb in the apple sauce added a good edge.
Bath Chaps, pickles, whipped lardo on toast

Bath Chaps, pickles, whipped lardo on toast
Cured and hot smoked bath chaps, whipped lardo on toast, pickles (beer: Beavertown Applelation): Great combination of soft, crunchy, sweet and tart.

Clams, Cheek, stinging nettles
Clams & Cheeks, actually stinging nettles, cider brandy and broad bean sauce (beer: Camden Gentleman’s Wit
Pork Shoulder & Ogleshield nuggets
The first highlight: Pork shoulder & Ogleshield nuggets (beer: Siren&Elusive Dinner for Four). So soft and juicy on the inside and crunchy on the outside, with the Tewkesbury Mustard creme fraiche a perfect foil.
Suckling pig

Suckling pig
Then, the centre piece, a whole suckling pig, slow roasted, pulled and served in steamed buns with green slaw and rhubarb and chilli sauce (beer: Magic Rock Cannonball). Brilliant, just brilliant. I think everyone overstuffed themselves on that course.

Jack's Gelato: Bacon Brittle Ice Cream
The dessert was special, too: Vanilla ice cream with bacon brittle by Jack’s Gelato with an Imperial Stout called “Heaven & Hell” from De Molen. Outstanding! Bacon in ice cream might sound weird but it worked just as well as salted caramel does.

This evening was pretty much perfect. We watched and learned butchery, had a fantastic meal of pork and beer and received a goodie bag with meat (our own butchery plus a roasting joint, a rolled piece of belly in my case) and beer to take home. I hope they will do something similar soon or at least for next year’s event.

There are more photos on flickr.

[Cooking] Scallops with chorizo and kale

I made this a couple of weeks ago but only just now came around to posting it. The fish van from Lowestoft had some good looking scallops so I picked up a handful.
I sliced a hot cooking chorizo and cooked them slowly over medium heat until the slices were crispy and had given off most of their fat which was enough to cook the scallops in. I took out the chorizo, turned the heat up to high and fried the scallops about a minute on each side, took the pan off the heat, added a generous knob of butter and basted the scallops with the melted butter/chorizo oil mix. In the meantime I had also steamed some kale. I drained the bits of kale and added them and the chorizo slices to the pan, coating everything in the butter and then arranged everything on a plate, took a photo and ate it where I stood, without bothering to sit down at the table. About halfway through I realised I hadn’t even seasoned the scallops but the spicy oil provided enough seasoning so they didn’t really need it. I was very happy with this dish.

Scallops, chorizo, kale