[Cooking] Duckmas

It was my first Christmas not only in Cambridge (I usually visit my parents in Germany) but also in my new flat which has a proper kitchen. So I decided to treat three of my friends to a hearty lunch. I ordered a duck from Radmore Farm who have a small but fine shop in Chesterton Road and instead of roasting it (I don’t trust my oven which is overheating and inconsistent) I jointed it. Out of the legs and the meaty parts of the wings I made confit (using leftover salmon cure with added garlic, crushed peppercorns and thyme), the breasts I pan-fried and finished in the oven and out of the carcass, wing tips and giblets I made stock.
I had two bags of giblets so I made a little snack of flash-fried hearts.

Duck hearts

From the various trimmings and bits of meat scraped off the carcass I made a burger:

Duck burger

The livers I turned into parfait (half a shallot, one glove of garlic finely chopped, sweated off in clarified butter, added the livers until cooked dark pink, then pulsed with salt, pepper and a glug of cream in the food processor). Served on crispbread, this was the starter at Boxing Day, together with the cured salmon:

Nibbles: whisky cured salmon and duck liver parfait

I clarified the stock, kept one half for cooking the lentils and the other half I reduced down with some red wine to make a sauce. The final dish consisted of picked leg and wing meat, sliced breast, lentils and broccoli:

Duck: pan roasted breast, confit leg, lentils broccoli
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[Cooking] Whisky cured salmon.

My latest fishbox included a beautiful fillet of salmon which I decided to cure.
Method:
Rub the fillet with whisky (something peaty and smoky is ideal, I used Jura).
Make a mix of equal quantities of salt and light brown sugar (enough to generously coat both sides of the fillet) and add some lightly crushed dried rosemary.
On a large piece of aluminium foil in two layers, spread a layer of the cure, set the fillet on top, skin side down, then spread the rest of the mix over the top and dribble some more whisky over the top.
Wrap the fillet tightly in the foil and leave in the fridge at least over night, longer if the fillet is really thick. The one I had was just about 1cm so over night was plenty.
To serve, wash the cure off the fillet and pat dry, then slice finely at a very flat angle. A fish knife with a flexible blade is ideal for this. You can wrap the salmon in clingfilm and it’ll keep for a few days in the fridge.
Serve on melba toast, crackers or crispbread. Add a little light horseradish or mustard cream if you fancy it but with mine, that wasn’t necessary.
Sliced, mine looked like this;

Whisky cured salmon

[Cooking] Sunday lunch: pheasant with cauliflower puree and mushroom sauce

I walked past Mill Road Butchers on Friday and decided to pop in to see what they had. The pheasants looked good so I picked up one for the Sunday.
As pheasant is notoriously dry I decided to cook it in parts. On Saturday I took off the legs and put them in brine (Water, salt, thyme, rosemary, smashed garlic. black peppercorns and allspice berries) to sit in the fridge over night. I also took off the breasts and chopped the carcass into chunks. The breasts went back into the fridge, the carcass with some chunks of onion and root veg into a hot oven until nicely browned, deglazed the roasting dish with a generous glug of port, filled up with water and let boil for a while to get all the bits off the bottom, then transferred the lot plus a good handful of dried mushrooms into a saucepan and simmered for a couple of hours, then passed the stock through a fine sieve, retaining the mushrooms and let it cool before moving it to the fridge.

On Sunday morning I patted the brined legs dry with kitchen paper, added them and the aromatics from the brine to a saucepan with barely simmering duck fat, waited until it was back to a simmer and then transferred the pan, covered in foil, to a low oven (just under 100 degrees on my dial, I checked every now and then that it stayed at a simmer). After about two hours they were done, nice and soft to the touch. I took them out and fried them skin side down in a hot pan until crispy (a few minutes). Then removed them and kept them warm while frying the breasts in lots of butter on a medium heat until nice and pink in the middle.

Then I checked the seasoning and served the lot, for I am greedy and was on my own, with crushed potatoes, steamed curly kale, cauliflower puree (see below) and a sauce made by reducing the stock with the mushrooms.

The cauliflower puree I started the day before by chopping the head into chunks, tossing them with olive oil, smoked paprika, cinnamon, sumac, salt and pepper and roasting them in a medium hot oven until soft and caramelised. On the Sunday, I reheated the chunks, added some stock and pureed them in the food processor, adding a little bit of whole milk for consistency. This was the element that brought everything together and I only made it because I had a cauliflower I needed to use up. I originally wanted to make soup but then had the idea to make a puree. The spicing worked really well.