Cooking with a fishbox from Coast and Glen

A while ago Tim Hayward (food writer and owner of Fitzbillies in Cambridge) tweeted about the fishbox from Coast and Glen. I had a look at the website and decided I would try it at some point as with exception of the van on Chesterton Road on Wednesday mornings, there is no decent fishmonger in Cambridge (I found the quality of the market stall to be variable). Last Friday that time had come. I had ordered the smallest box and had previously given my preferences on the website (you can exclude things altogether and prioritise others). The styrofoam box contained four fresh whole langoustines, four shelled scallops, and a filleted portion each of megrim, salmon, blue ling and tusk. The salmon and tusk went straight into the freezer, the langoustines I cooked according to the included instructions and took out the tail meat. I fried the scallops in a mix of rapeseed oil and butter until crispy, took them off the heat and added the lango tails to warm through. Simply served on dressed leaves, this was my starter. The quality of the seafood was superb, both the scallops and langos really sweet and flavourful. They hardly needed seasoning.

Fresh langoustines, ready to be cooked
Fresh langoustines, ready to be cooked
Pan fried scallops and lango tails, dressed leaves
Scallops and langoustine tails on dressed leaves

As main, i gently fried the megrim in the same pan, served lightly seasoned with more dressed leaves and a hunk of fresh sourdough bread. it was just as delightful as the langoustines and scallops and could hardly have been fresher.

[Cooking] Braised lamb neck, sweet potato mash, curly kale

I love cheaper cuts that need a bit of love and attention so when the Art of Meat had lamb neck, I picked up a few chunks.
I dusted them with seasoned flour (salt, pepper, smoked paprika), seared them in rapeseed oil in a hot casserole until brown all over, took them out and in the same pan fried chunks of onion, leek, carrot and garlic until softened slightly, put the meat back in, about half a litre of red wine and chicken stock each to just cover,added a sprig each of rosemary and thyme, put a lid on, let it come to a simmer and transferred to a 100 degree oven for about 3 hours. I took out the meat to rest, strained the liquid, took half of it and reduced it until it was thickened a bit and shiny. Adjusted the seasoning with salt, pepper, smoked paprika, ras el hanout and sumac. Meanwhile, in the rest of the stock, I cooked the sweet potatoes until tender and mashed them with milk, butter and seasoning.
Finally, I picked the meat off the bones, removing excess fat and gristle, warmed it through in the sauce and served on top of the sweet potato mash and some steamed and buttered kale.
Plated it looked like this

Braised lamb neck, sweet potato mash, curly kale
This also freezes well and is even better the second time round, like many stews and braises